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Full text of "Euclid Shore High School - The Log"



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Euclid Public Library 



http://archive.org/details/euclidshorehighs1939unse 



Foreword . . . 



To bring back fond memories of the past and to afford many 
hours of entertainment in the future is the purpose of "this Log. 

Herein, are gathered the faces of your classmates, some of 
whom have won distinction through their attainments in athletics, 
through activities, and scholarship. 

If, in years to come, you can sit in an arm chair and spend an 
enjoyable hour or two with this annual, recognizing your old friends 
and watching them parade by in a silent panorama of their activi- 
ties, the members of the Annual Board will feel amply repaid for 
their efforts. 

We wish to make known at this time our appreciation for the 
cooperation of our faculty advisers, Mr. James Card, who scruti- 
nized our copy for mistakes and criticisms; Mr. Robert Finch, for 
his fine work in financing this annual ; and, Mr. Lester E. Angene. 
whose unceasing and excellent management of the Log was invalu- 
able. Not to be forgotten are Mr. Robert Phillips and Mr. Roy 
Hinch, who through their excellent cooperation completed the fine 
work done on the photography in this book. 

The staff also wishes to thank all those students who have 
made helpful contributions in both writing and photography. 






Pane Two 



PRESENTING 




THE LOG BOOK 

of 1 939 

Shore High School 

PUBLISHED BY THE MEMBERS 

OF THE 

SENIOR CLASS 



Faye Three 



Contents . . . 



SUPERVISION AND INSTRUCTION 
WE WHO DEPART 

THOSE WE LEAVE BEHIND 

PASTIMES AND PLEASURES 

OUR CONTRIBUTIONS IN SPORTS 
DAY BY DAY AT SHORE 



I' aye I'nm 



Supervision 

and 

Instruction 



"THE IDEALS AND PURPOSES of the 
principal and his staff help our school 
to grow in service to youth. In this section 
we express, in general, the school's educa- 
tional outlook. We introduce the staff of 
the Shore School and officials of the Euclid 
Public Schools. 



I'uijc Fiic 



The Principal's Office 




For his untiring efforts in promoting our 
welfare, in successfully inculcating princi- 
ples and duties of citizenship, and in fos- 
tering a spirit of friendship and coopera- 
tion, we, the senior class, thank Principal 
Leonard E. Loos. We will all remember 
the many unfailing attempts he has made 
to better our interests and associations. 



LEONARD E. LOOS 



In our office at Shore can be found three excellent workers who are contin- 
ually typing reports, filing records, receiving callers, recording expenses, or 
answering telephone calls. These girls are Miss Philomena Vidugeris, the prin- 
cipal's secretary ; Miss Dorothy Stray, stenographer and telephone operator, and 
Mrs. Crampton, clerk. Their effort and management are to be commended. 




Left to Riyht — Philomena Virlugeris, Dorothy Stray, and Mrs. Crampton. 



Page Six 



Comprehensive Services of 
Shore School 



Shore School offers a program of studies that is broad and designed to meet 
the needs, interests, and abilities of all who seek to continue their education. 
The work is no longer strictly academic and limited in scope to the college pre- 
paratory studies. While students who so choose are well prepared for college, 
the first and most fundamental purpose of the school is to prepare students for 
life — life in its broad, cultural setting. 

Shore ma}' well be called a comprehensive school. The public mind is accus- 
tomed to think of school life as consisting mostly of class-room instruction. This 
no longer gives a fair picture of the purposes and operation of a modern school. 
Because of the broad mission of the high school, the educational program is 
thought of as including not only classes but the opportunities of club and home- 
room activities, assemblies, personal counseling in matters of career and life 
adjustment, athletics, musical activities, dramatic and other artistic ventures, etc. 

Instead of using only textbooks and lectures for instruction, the school makes 
wide use of visual education, especially through the showing of movies and the 
participation of educational tours. 

In this brief space only the general problem of planning and supervision can 
be suggested. It may be pointed out that the work of the principal of the school 
and his staff has two main purposes : 

1. Maintaining an educational program of high standard. 

2. Constantly studying the possibilities for improving the program 
of the school. 

In maintaining an educational program of high standard, the school strives 
not only for scholarship in certain fields but for the development of character 
and personality in students as individuals and for the promotion of cooperative 
group life among students. Shore School has constantly maintained a service of 
educational guidance, especially through the agency of the home-room. In this 
group, each student receives the advice and counsel of a teacher who is well 
acquainted with him and thoroughly familiar with his educational record and 
ambitions. 

1 he educational program of the schools, since it tries to provide a whole and 
wholesome life for young people, encourages the formation of student clubs for 
the development of special interests and for cooperative participation. 

The spirit of helping and guiding pupils is associated with all of the super- 
visory and instructional activities of the school and no one activity is considered 



Facjc Seven 



apart as guidance. This follows the theory that there is more learning from 
practice than from preaching. 

Shore School considers the physical activities of the students in intramural 
and interscholastic athletics as exceptional opportunities for teaching people how 
to live well. In fact, conscious effort has been applied to maintaining a wise bal- 
ance of physical and mental activities. This is in keeping with the motto inscribed 
over the arch of Shore Auditorium: "Dedicated to the youth of this city for the 
development of mind and body." 

In constantly improving services for students, certain new plans have been 
tried or adopted. For the last two years, students interested in attending colleges 
or other schools of higher learning have had the opportunity to be helped with then- 
plans by taking part in the career and college program held each January. At 
these programs, many representatives of colleges have been available for consul- 
tation. 

During the current vear, a Life Purpose Week program was introduced. The 
theme of this event was "Let Us Have a Purpose and a Plan." 

Students have commented that some young people change their plans for a 
career even- time the\- see a different profession or occupation depicted in the 
movies. Although the held of occupational choice is a wide one, there was an 
opportunity during the Life Purpose Week for each student to get a general idea 
of the broad fields of opportunity and to make headway in choosing a career. 

Throughout the year personal counseling is afforded the student by his home- 
room teacher, the deans, the principal, and representatives of agencies outside of 
the school who are consulted. 

The home-room is the core of the school organization. It gives everv student 
a chance to meet at least once each day with a teacher who is interested in him 
for a longer time than a single course requires. In the home room, pupils have 
plentiful opportunities for civic, social, and character-developing activities. 

Home-room activities foster school spirit. Sportsmanship, fair play and other 
good habits are developed. Furthermore, desirable personality traits are devel- 
oped by the experiences in these groups. 

In all classes and activities Shore School practices "guidance." In its many 
activities, Shore School strives best to serve the student and his community. The 
following pages tell in part how this is done. 



Pcuic Bir/ht 



The Personnel Staff 





MR. PEAKE 



MISS ALBRECHT 



Mr. Peake, dean of boys, is available 
for conferences on vocational and career 
problems. He, also, promotes home 
room programs, supervises attendance 
and assists in scheduling. 

Miss Albrecht, dean of girls, affords 
personal counseling in the high school 
and assists in the elementary school. 
Like the dean of boys, she maintains 
records about students and professionally 
considers their problems. 

Air. Vorhees, director of pupil person- 
nel, is the man for the "main office" 
who checks up on all attendance cases 
referred to him by the school. He, also, 
assists various organizations in social 
service projects. 




MR. VORHEES 



Page Nine 



Euclid Public School Officals 




This legislative and policy-forming body, the Board of Education, has done 
much in the way of the advancement and progressiveness of Shore High. It is 
to them that we direct compliments for their praiseworthy work. 



To Dr. E. C. Grover, Superintendent 
of Euclid Schools, goes our deep appre- 
ciation for his unending interests in the 
improvement of our school during our 
brief stay with it. His helpful sugges- 
tions and additions have made school life 
more pleasant, as well as interesting 
for us. 




DR. E. C. GROVER 



I'uije Ten 



Instructional Departments 




ENGLISH 

Composition . . . Poetry . . . Drama . . . English and 
American Literature, everything in the way of writing and speak- 
ing — that is a course in English. The love of one's country comes 
forth in the speaking of her tongue. Rare gems of poetry, a good 
book and the true appreciation of it ; culture and refinement, intelli- 
gence and foresight — all these are attained, when with an open mind 
one takes a course in English. 



U5INC' THE 

If 





MISS AINGWORTH 
English 9 



AIR. AXGENE 
English 11, 12 



MISS CAMPBELL 

General English 

10A English 



Page Eleven 



The World of the "Unknown" 




MISS TEMPERTON 

Algebra, Trigonometry, 
Geometry 



MR. HINCH 
Algebra, English 



MISS WOODWORTH 
Mathematics 7, 8 



MRS. WILSON 

General Mathematics, 

Mathematics 7 



Mure and more apparent does the universality of mathematics become to 
the student as he sees its application in his daily work, whether working out a 
page plan for the Log, counting calories for a well-balanced meal, or any of the 
numerous tasks which may be listed. The school offers expert training in alge- 
bra, plane and solid geometry, and trigonometry, so that the student may add to 
his mathematical training. 

A student majoring in math, studies algebra in the first year of high school, 
plane geometry in his sophomore year ; in the junior year he chooses between a 
full year of algebra or a half year of algebra and a half year of solid geometry ; 
in the senior year, he may elect trigonometry, solid geometry or advanced alge- 
bra, provided he has studied the proper prerequisites. 




MATHEMATICS 



Page Twelve 



The World of Business 




COMMERCIAL DEPARTMENT 

This department offers an intensely valuable course as interesting as any 
which the high school provides. Subjects which will be of definite value to the 
students in the business world are taught fully and efficiently in this department. 
Some of the newer additions to the department are Ediphones, Calculators, book- 
keeping Machines, Filing Systems, and the latest Ditto and Mimeograph 
Machines. Four semesters of shorthand and typewriting are an important divi- 
sion of the Commercial Department as well as four semesters of Business, two 
semesters of P>ookkeeping, and two of Office Practice. 




MISS DARST 

Shorthand, 
Office Practice 



MR. FINCH 

Business, 
Bookkeeping 



MISS PHYPERS 
Shorthand, Typing 



Page Thirteen 



For Better Homes 




MISS LEMON 
Clothing 



MISS ROSENBERGER 

Cooking 



HOME ARTS 

The Home Arts Department constitutes an important part of our set-up in 
the high school. In the various classes the girls are taught to plan, prepare, and 
serve meals and to make their own clothing. In addition, they study home man- 
agement, budgeting, and art as related to home and clothing. The girls learn 
to make better use of their leisure time, energy, and money, and learn the funda- 
mentals of good home making. 




Page Fourteen 



With A Nail and A Hammer 




INDUSTRIAL ARTS 

An interesting feature included in these arts is mechanical drawing. This study is interesting to all who 
have any talent for drawing. The work consists of drawing geometrical figures and designs ; practice in the 
drawing of machine parts and architectural figures. In Shop students make various articles of use and of 
pictufesque design. Many of these articles are later used in the homes of the boys who make them. Indus- 
trial Arts gives a background for work in later life. 




MR. POHTO 
Mechanical Drawing, Mathematics 8 



MR. CASE 
Industrial Arts 



MR. WINTERS 

Industrial Arts 



Past, Present, and Future 



top row 
mr, win i- 1 :s 1 1 ) i-: 

American History 
So< ial Probli ms 



MR. VAUGHN 

Social Studies 
Economics 
Journalism 
Social Problems 



MR. SCHWEGLER 
World History 
Social Studies 9 




BOTTOM ROW 

MISS DAVIS 

English 
Social Studies 



MR. BANDLOW 
American History 



MISS PIERSON 
English 7 
Social Studies 



To awaken the young people of today and help them fulfill their duties to 
their community and country, Social Studies are taught in the high schools. 
"Why bother to study the past — the future and the present are the most impor- 
tant." This is the remark often heard but one finds that in order to make the 
present and the future all it should be, a study of past mistakes must be made 
thus to avoid making them again. 




SOCIAL STUDIES 



Page Sixteen 



Aid To Man 




SCIENCE 



The world of today is a world of Science 

Science is the backbone of existence — these are the 
thoughts of people today. Chemistry, once thought 
"witch's magic," now essential to our mechanized 
world which it has made possible. Biology, once 
thought a wicked practice, now a tool of man to pre- 
vent disease and plague. In order to fully appreciate 
its uses and value Science is brought into our schools 
to be better understood and to send future helpers of 
humanity into the world. 




MR. PHIIXII'S 
Physics, Chemistry, Science 




MR. SPANGLER 

Science 7, 9; Biology 



MISS CRONE 
Science 7, 8; Algebra 9 



MISS STAUFFKR 
Science 



MR. GEBHART 
Biology, Science 9 



Page Seventeen 



Strokes of Genius 





MISS WENDEI<BURGH 

Art and Ceramics 



ART 
Vivid, splashing colors used cleverly on bits of manila and behold before 
your eyes a scene is depicted and you pause to admire an artist's creation. A 
lump of clay — a finely shaped vase — ceramics class. Art appeals to eyes and has 
a restful effect on those who help to make it as well as those who see it. As the 
poet expresses himself in verse so does the artist in paint or crayon and the- 
molding of a mass of clay into a thing of beauty. 

VOCAL EXPRESSION 
If art is appreciated through seeing then surely music is appreciated through 
hearing, whether that music be made by instrument or by voices. Few are tal- 
ented with a beautiful voice and few are born knowing how to play a violin but 
through training and practice these things are achieved. Music has an important 
place because it helps develop a sense of rhythm and harmony. 




MR. RAISH 




MUSIC 



Page Eighteen 



If s All "Greek" to Some of Us 




MISS WILLIAMS 
Latin 



MR. VACCARIRLLO 

General Language 
Social Studies, English 



MISS DELAMATER MR. CARD 

French, English German, Speech, Dramatics 



FOREIGN LANGUAGES 

When our own unruly language has been conquered, we set out to find new- 
languages to explore. Whether it be Latin, German, or French matters not, for 
each has a definite benefit and a definite use. 

Latin, long known as a dead language because it is not spoken by a race, is 
the basic foundation of most languages and therefore of utmost value. French 
and German give a wider and broader knowledge of the world without, and what 
better way is there to learn to know one's fellowmen than by learning their his- 
tory and customs while studying their language ! 

Now more than ever before, there is a need for the better understanding 
of our neighbors across the ocean. One of the finest ways is to study a foreign 
language. 




FRAN 



Page Nineteen 



A Sound Mind In A Sound Body 





DR. XAMEX 



HEALTH 

Health is essential to the well-being and happiness 
of any individual. Instruction and advice is given to 
the students concerning physical and mental health. 
The students learn not only the care and preservation 
of the body but also about prevention of disease and 
what to do in case of illness. 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

Two well-known spots in our school are our gym- 
nasiums. The boys and girls each boost their own. 
They spend many active and interesting hours apply- 
ing their time in various sports of skill and strength. 
The gyms provide a splendid opportunity for healthful 
athletics and exercise. The entire student body gives 
annually a public exhibition of their skills. 




MISS HORVATH 




MR. SWACKHAMER 
Physical Education 



MR. SCHMIDT 

Physical Education, 

Social Studies < s 



MISS (.ILL 
Physical Education 



Page Twenty 



Graduates .... 1939 



We Who Depart 



The height of high school ambition — to have attained the rank 
of Senior ! And now that our time has come there is the sadness 
of parting' — longing regrets for neglected opportunities. 

The prom, senior pictures, senior banquet, graduation, annual, 
senior play — what a whirl were those last few months ! 

Basketball, football, baseball (and we did have good teams, 
didn't we?) — with regret we leave them behind to face the future — 
awesome in its spirit of desired and veiled ambitions. 



Page Twenty-two 



January Graduates 



EDITH BACKWINKEL 

Friendship Club 2, 3, 4; Girls' 
Leaders Club 4: Orchestra 1, 2, 
3, 4. 



DONALD BORGER 

Band 4; Robed Choir 3, 4; An- 
nual Staff 4; President of Cho- 
rus 4; Hoys' Leaders Club 3. 



MARY LOU CAMPBELL 
Friendship Club 2, 3, 4; G.A.C. 
1. 3, 4; Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Class Secretary, 2, 3, 4. 



JOHN CHRISTOPHER 

Hi-Y 2, 3; Shore Breeze Staff 3. 



JACK DOW 

Wrestling 3, 4; Hi-Y 4; Band 3, 
4; Orchestra 3; President of 
Chorus 2, 3, 4; Robed Choir 3, 
4; Class Vice President 1; Class 
President 3, 4; Student Council 
2, 3. 



LOIS FRIEDRICK 

Friendship Club 2, 3, 4; G.A.C. 
1, 2, 3; Prom Committee. 




HAROLD BEZDEK 

Football 1, 2, 3; Basketball 1, 3; 
Hockey 3, 4; Baseball 4; Track 
1. 4; Hi-Y 3. 



ROSE BUSHER 

Glee Club. 



RONALD CARRIE 

Baseball. 



MARIE DITRJCH 

Friendship Club 3, 4; Glee Club 



ROBERT FISHER 

Football Mgr. 4; Hockey 4; 
Baseball 3, 4; Hi-Y 4. 



VERA GOLE 

Friendship Club 4; Chorus 2; 
Glee Club 3. 



Page Twenty-three 



K VTHERINE GOMMEL 
Friendship Club -'. 3, 4; G.A.C. 
2, 3, 4; Girls' Leaders Club 4; 
Prom Committee 3; Annual Staff 
i: Class Officers, V. Pres. 4; 
Student Council 2, 3, 4. 



EILEEN HARPER 

G.A.C. 3, 4; Girls' Leaders Club 

4. 



WALTER HEHR 

Hi-Y 3, 4; Hockey; Basebal 



FRANK MONTANA 

Football 2, 3, 4; Basketball 2, 3, 
4; Baseball 2, 3, 4; Hi-Y 2, 3, 4; 
Student Council 1, 3, 4; Class 
Officers, President 1; V. Presi- 
dent 3. 



MAXINE OHL 

Friendship Club 2, 3, 4; G.A.C. 

2, 3; Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4: Robed 
Choir 3, 4; Shore Breeze Staff 

3, 4; Prom Committee 3. 



EMIL PODNAR 

Football l; Basketball 1; Base- 
ball 4; Hi-Y 3, 4; Student Coun- 
cil 1. 




rACK GROSSMAN 

Football .5. 4; Hockey 4; Track 

3. 



PHYLLIS HARRIS 

G.A.C. 3, 4; Glee Club I, 4. 



FRANK KLAXON 

Wrestling 1, 2, 3; Baseball 2, 3. 



CONSTANCE NARYELEIT 

Friendship Club Sec. 2; V. Pres, 
3, Pres. 4; G.A.C. 2, 3, 4; Girls- 
Leaders Club 4; Prom Commit- 
tee Chairman of Refreshments 
3, Class Officers Sec. 2, Student 
Council 3, 4. 



DORIS O'NEILL 

Friendship Club 2, 3, 4; G.A.C. 
3, 4; Shore Breeze Staff 4; Stu- 
dent Council 2. 



IOHN RAGBORG 

Hockey 3, 4; Hi-Y 4; Prom. 
Committee 3; Class President 1, 



Page Twenty-four 



HENRY ROYER 

Basketball 1, 3, 4; Hi V 2. 



GARNET SULZER 

Glee Club 4. 



LAYERNE WACHTELE 

Friendship Club 2. 




JOROTHY SKEEPAK 

Friendship Club 2; G.A.C. 2, 3; 
Girls' Leaders Club 4; Chorus -; 
Class Treasurer 4. 



JEAN VIJANDE 

Friendship Club 3, 4; Orchestra 
1; Glee Club 2; Student Coun- 
cil 2. 



ELIZABETH WEIR 

G.A.C. 1, 2; Glee Club 1, 2, 3; 
Kobed Choir 3, 4. 



Paye Twenty-five 



June Graduates 



BETTY ANDERSON 

Friendship Club 2, 3, 4; Secre- 
tary 4; Shore Breeze -', 3, 4; 
Business Manager 3, I: G.A.C. 
1. -'. 3, I. Treasurer 2, 3, Presi- 
.Win l: Glee Club I. .': Cheer- 
leading 3: Kent 2; Annual Stair 
4; Prom Committee 3; Leaders' 
Club l; Senior Play 4. 



MARY BARRESI 

Friendship Club 1; Dancing 
Club 2; G.A.C. l ; Glee Club 4; 
Chorus 1. 



DORIS BERNER 

G.A.C. 1, 2, 3, 4; Glee Club 3; 
Friendship Club _, 3, -I : Chorus 
4, Secretary 4; Uobed Choir 4; 
Shore Breeze 3. 



SHIRLEY BLOOD 

Entered from Collinwood High 
4; Friendship Club 4; Glee Club 
4; G.A.C. 4. 



RUTH I'.LDNICK 

Friendship Club 2. 3, 4; Git 
Club 1; Dancing Club 2. 



PEGGY CAMPLEJOHN 

Shore Breeze 1, 2; Leaders' 
Club 4; G.A.C. 1. 2, 3, 4, Sec- 
retary 4; Friendship Club 2, 3, 
4. [nter-Club Councilor 3, Vice- 
President 4; Annual Staff 4; 
IVoni Committee 3; Senior Play 
4. 




RUTH ANDREWS 

Friendship Club 2, 3, I; Ring 
Group 4; G.A.C. 2, 3; Chorus 4; 
Glee Club 4. 



LOIS BERGLUND 

Glee Club 1, 2; G.A.C. 1, 2, 3, 
4; Friendship Club 2, 3, 4: King 
Croup 3, Treasurer 3; Chorus 
3, 4. 



ROBERT BKUTLER 

Ili-V 3; Band 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Club 4. 



Glee 



ROBERT BRANDT 

Entered from Cathedral Latin 
3; Hockey 4; Hi-Y 4; Engineers 
Club 3; \Vhirlo Club 4. 



CARLO CAMPITELLI 

Shore Breeze 1 ; Student Council 
4; Treasurer 4; Football 2, 3; 
Gym Exhibition 3, 4; Chorus 1, 
2, 3; Hand I; Freshman Foot- 
ball; Whirlo Club 4; Vice Presi- 
dent 4; Operetta; Student Coun- 
cil Advisory lioard. 



MARY JANE CAMPBELL 
Friendship Club 3; G.A.C. I; 
Hand 1; Glee Club 1; Student 



Council 1. 



Page Twenty-si* 



MAY CARLGREN 

Chorus 2, 3, 4, Treasurer 2; 
Glee Cltih 2, 3; Robed Choir 4; 
Friendship Club 2, 3, 4, Treas- 
urer 4, Ring Group Chairman 4, 
Ring Group 3, 4, Secretary 3; 
G.A.C. 1, 2, 3, 4, Vice-President 
4; Leaders' Club 4; Kent 2; As- 
sistant Editor of Log 4; Senior 
Play 4. 



BRUCE CLARKE 

Rasketball 1, 2, 3, 4; Track 1, 3, 
4; Football 4; Tennis 4; Prom 
Committee 3; Rand 1, 2, 3; Or- 
chestra 1, 2, 3, 4; Hi-Y 3, 4; 
Student Council 3; Class Treas- 
urer 1, 2; Ring Committee 4. 



BLANCHE CROCKETT 

Glee Club 3, Treasurer 3; Cho- 
rus 4; G.A.C. 1, 2, 3, 4; Lead- 
ers' Club 4; Student Council 4; 
Shore Breeze 3, 4; Friendship 
Club 2, 3, 4. 



CARMEN DAVIRRO 

Dancing Club 2; Auto Club 3. 



MAY DAVIS 

G.A.C. 1, 2, 3, 4; Glee Club 2. 
3; Friendship Club 2, 3, 4; Cho- 
. rus 4; Leaders* Club 4; Ring 
Group 4; Kent 1, 2; Robed 
Choir 4. 



DICK DICKSON 
Hi-Y 4. 




MARILYN CASE 

Rand 2, 3, 4; Secretary Orchestra 
1, 2, 3, 4; Glee Club 1 ; Annual 
Staff 4; Leaders' Club 4; Prom 
Committee 3; Breeze Staff 3, 4; 
Friendship Club 2, 3, 4; G.A.C. 
1, 2, 3, 4; Vice President 3; 
Senior Play 4. 



BETTY COWIN 

G.A.C. 1; Leaders 



Club 3; Cho- 



BETTY DANIELS 

Student Council 1, 2, 3; Photog- 
raphy Club 1; Friendship Club 
2, 3, 4; Glee Club 3; Class Sec- 
retary 2; Class Treasurer 3; 
Ring Group 4. 



MARGARET DAMS 

G.A.C. 1, 2, 3, 4, Vice President 
3; Glee Club 2; Friendship Club 
2, 3; Chorus 3; Recreation Club 
3; Travel Club 4, Treasurer 4; 
Leaders' Club 4. 



IOSEPH DEMPSEY 

Football 1, 3, 4; Basketball 1, 2, 
3, 4; Track 1, 2; Tennis 3, 4; 
Baseball 4; Class President 1, 2, 
3. 4; Hi-Y 3, 4, Treasurer 4; 
Prom Chairman 3 ; Jr. Hi-Y 
President 3; Ring Committee 4; 
Picture Committee 4. 



MARTHA DRAGANIC 

Dancing Club 2; Charm Club 4; 
Dancing Club 4. 



Pane Twenty-seven 



GILBERT ETTENGER 

Band 3, I; Dancing Club 3; 

I 'Tinting Club 4; Drama Club 4. 



RILL FINNERTY 

Printing Club; Sliore Breeze 
Staff; Photography Club; Auto- 
mobile Club. 



DOROTHY FOX 

Girls' Leaders Club 4; Ad. Com- 
mittee 4; Glee Club 3; Chorus 2. 



ADELINE GEIGER 

Friendship Club 2, 3, 4; G.A.C. 
4; Glee Club 3; Robed Choir 4; 
Shore Breeze Staff 4; Prom 
Committee 3; Annual Staff 4; 
Ad Committee 4; Chorus 4. 



MERYL GOODHEAD 

Shore Breeze Staff 3, 4; \nnual 
Staff 4; G.A.C. 4; Friendship 
Club 2, 3, 4; Glee Club 3; Cho- 
rus 4. 



ANNE GREGORIN 

Friendship Club 2, 3, 4; G.A.C. 

1, 2, 3, 4; Girls' Leaders Club 
4; Glee Club 3; Chorus 4; Shore 
Breeze Staff 3, 4; Annual Staff 
4. 








Band 3, 4; Orchestra 2, 3, 4 

Share Erieze staff 3 \nnual 

Staff, Editor 4; Chorus 2. 3; 
Kent 2; Cheerleader 2; Senior 
Play I; Dance Band 2, 3; See. 
of Whirlo Club. 



JACK FLAMMANG 

Track; Advisory Board, Student 
Council; Hand, President; Or- 
chestra; Hi-Y; Dance Maud; Le- 
gion Orat : on Award; Dramatics; 
Gym Leaders' Club. 



GEORGE FULLER 

Printing Club 4; Auto Club 3; 
Basketball Manager 3 ; Sta^e 
Club 2; Shore Breeze Staff 4. 



PAUL GEORGE 

Football 1, 3, 4; Track 2, 3, 4; 
Student Council 3; Class Secre- 
tary 4; Hi-Y 3, 4; Camera Club 
2; Prom Committee 3; Senior 
Play. 



MARGOT GRANEY 

Friendship Club 2. 4; G.A.C. 4; 
Kent 2; Shore Breeze, Staff Edi- 
tor 4; Shore Breeze Staff 3, 4; 
Senior Play. 



GEORGE GREVE 

Hi-Y 3, 4; Football 1, 3. 4; 
Prom Committee 3; Class Treas- 
urer 4; Adv. Manager of Log 4; 
Football Manager 2; Movie 
Booth I, 2; Picture Committee 
4; Senior Play. 



Paijc Twenty- eiyhl 



BETTY GRONDA 

G.A.C. 1; Drivers' Club 2; 
Drama Club 2; Women's Voca- 
tion Club 3. 



RALPH HARPER 

Ad Committee 4; Student Coun- 
cil 4; Track 3, 4; Drama Club 

3; Hi-Y 4. 



HAZEL HAWLEY 



Band 1, 2, 3, 4; Choir 2; Or- 
chestra 1, 2, 3, 4; Recreation 
Club 3, 4; Photography Club 2; 
Theory and Harmony Club 4; 
Sec. of Hand 4. 



EDWARD HEGLAW 

Baseball 2, 3, 4; Hockey 3, 4; 

Football 3, 4; Student Council 

4; Hi-Y 3, 4; Prom Committee 
3. 



BILLIE HELPHREY 

Entered from Collinwood 3 ; 
G.A.C. 4; Friendship Club 3, 4; 
Program Chairman 4; Shore 
Breeze Staff 3, 4; Prom Com- 
mittee 4; Senior Play 4; Acl 
Commitee 4; Secretary of Auto 
Club 3. 



BETTY HUNT 

Glee Club 4; Robed Choir 4; 
Dramatics Club 4; President; 
W.G.A.R. Speech Contest 4. 




JACK GROSSMAN 

Entered from Willoughby High 
Junior Year, Hi-Y 3. 



NEAL HARVEY 

Drama Club 3, 4; Senior Play 4. 



ROBERT HAYES 

Football 1. 3, 4; Basketball 1, 
Wrestling 2, 3; Track 3; Hi-Y 
4. 



BETTY HEISS 

Friendship Club 2, 3, 4; G.A.C. 
1, 2, 3, 4; Glee Club 1, 2, 3; 
Shore Breeze Staff 4; Prom. 
Committee 3; Annual Staff 4; 
Ad Committee 3; A Capella 
Choir 1; Senior Play 4. 



JOHN HENN 

Entered from Princeton High 
School Senior year, Band 4; Or- 
chestra 4; Hockey Manager 4; 
Photography Club 4; Secretary 
and Treasurer. 



ROBERT HUSTON 

Wrestling 4; Annual Staff 4; 
Senior Play 4; Student Council 
1; Camera Club 2, 3, 4. 



Vaijc Twenty-nine 



FRANCES JANITZ 

Friendship Club 4; Shore Breeze 
Staff 4 ; I'rom Committee 3; 
Class Officers Secretary 2; Pop- 
ular Orchestra .i. 



DANIEL JOHNSTONF. 

A Capella Choir 2; Chorus 1, 2; 
Kubi'il Choir 4; Ad Committee 

4; Movie Booth 1, 2, 3, 4. 



FRANCES KARDOS 

Friendship Club 1, 2, 3, 4; G. 
A. C. 1, 2. 



BETTY KILLEEN 

Friendship Club 2, 3, 4; Banquet 
Committee 4. 



TANE KOVACICH 



Dancing Club 3; A Capella 
Choir 2; Drama Club 4; Robed 
Choir 3, 4; Glee Club 2; Chorus 
2, 3, 4. 



JOSEPH LIPOVEC 

Traek 1; Football 1, 2; Basket- 
ball 1, 3, 4; Baseball 3, 1; Shore 
Breeze Staff 4. 




ROBERT JASON 

Dancing Club 3; Baseball 2, 3, 
4; Hi-V 3, 4; I'rom Committee 
3; Chorus 2; Class Officers 
Treasurer 3. 



GEORGE KALIOPE 

Dancing Club 1, 2; National Ri- 
fle Club 4; Class Officer Treas- 
urer 3. 



DOROTHY KEMPTER 

Friendship Club 2, 3, 4; G.A.C. 

1, 2. 



ANNE KOCMAN 

Dancing Club 2, 3; Whirlo Club 
4; Typing Club 3; G.A.C. 1, 2; 
Girls' Leaders Club 4. 



CORNELTA 
KUCHENBACKER 

Friendship Club 2, 3, 4; G.A.C. 

1, 2, 3. 4; Girls' Leaders Club 
4; Hand 1, 2, 3, 4; Orchestra 1. 

2, 3, 4; Shore Breeze Staff 4; 
Annual Staff 4; Class Officers 
Pres. 1. 



ANTOINETTE MARKUM 

Girls' Leaders Club 4; G.A.C. 
1, 2; Whirlo Club 4; Typing 
Club 3; Dancing Club 2, 3. 



Page Thirty 



EDWARD MARSHALL 

Wrestling 4; Kent I, 2; Annual 
Staff, Business Manager 4; Ad 
Committee 4; Student Council 
President 4. 



ELEANOR MAYO 

G.A.C. I, 2, 3, I; Glee Club 3, 
4; Prom Committee 3; Charm 
Club 3; Dancing Club 2, 3, 4. 



OTIS McKEON 

Football 1, 2, 3, 4; Basketball 1, 
2, 3, 4; Hi-Y 4; Shore Breeze 
Staff 3, 4; Banquet Committee 4. 



WILLI AM MOORE 

Football 1, 2, 3, 4; Basketball 1, 
3; Hockey 3, 4; Baseball 2, 3, 4; 
Hi-Y 3, 4; Chorus 3; Shore 
Breeze Staff 3, 4; Prom Com- 
mittee 3; Class Secretary 3; Stu- 
dent Council 1, 3. 



VIRGINIA NEMEC 

■ Entered Senior Year; Friend- 
ship Club 4. 



VERNA OHL 

Friendship Club 2, 3; Glee Club 
2, 3, 4; Shore Breeze Staff 4. 




RORERT MATTHEWS 

Wrestling 3; Track 3; Hi-Y 3, 4. 



BETTY McCOY 

Cheerleader 3, 4; Chorus 3, 4; 
Friendship Club 3, 4; G.A.C. 1, 
2, 3, 4; Glee Club 3, 4; Assist- 
ant Editor of Shore Breeze 2, 3, 
4; Annual Staff 4; Senior Play/ 



BRYAN MOFFET 

Basketball 2, 3; Mgr. 4; Dancing; 
Club 2, 3, -4; Hi-Y 4. 



JAMES MOULTON 

Ad Committee 2, 3, 4; Student 
Council 1, 2; Prom Committee 
3; Wrestling 4; Hi-Y 4; Annual 
Staff 4. 



TONY O'BREZA 

Football Manager 1 ; Shor. 
Breeze Staff 3; Class Officer 1. 



BETTY JO PATTON 

Friendship Club 2, 3, 4; Prom- 
Committee 3; Class Vice Presi- 
dent 3. 



Pacie Thirty-one 



NICK PEROVICH 

Student Council 2. 



MILAN PLUTT 
Football 4; Track 3. 



BETTY RAY 

Friendship Club 2, 3, 4; G.A.C. 
2, 3, 4; Glee Club 1, 2, 3; Shore 
Breeze Staff 1; Prom Committee 
3 J Annual Staff 4; Ad Commit- 
tee 1, 2, 3, 4; Senior Play. 



HARRY REEVES 



ALBERT ROOSMA 

Wrestling 2, 3, 4; Class Vice 
President 4; Ad Committee 2, 
3, 4. 



GRACE SAMPSON 

Friendship Club 2, 3, 4; G.A.C. 



^ ft 




ALBERT PHILLIPS 

Football 4; Dance Orchestra 2, 

I: Baseball I; Orchestra 1, 2, 
3, 4. 



JOSEPH RAMON A 



STANLEY REARICK 

Wrestling 1, 2; Track I; Hi-Y 
2, 3, 4; Shore Breeze Staff 4: 
Student Council 1 ; Movie ISooth 
.5. 4; Senior Play. 



EDNA RILLIE 

Drama Club 3, 4; Friendship 
Club 3; G.A.C. 4; Hand 4; Glee 
Club 3; Shore Breeze Staff 4; 
Chorus 4. 



DOROTHY ROW 

Friendship Club 3, 4; G.A.C. 1, 
2, 3, 4; Girls' Leaders Club I; 
Shore Breeze Staff 4. 



HELEN SAVCHAK 

Friendship Club 2; Glee Club 4. 



Page Thirty-two 



JACK SCHLAEGER 

Hockey 4; G.A.C. 1, 2. 



LOIS SEMPLE 

Friendship Club 2, 3, 4; G.A.C. 
2, 3, 4; Girls' Leaders Club 4; 
Secretary and Treasurer; Class 
Officer Treasurer 2; Shore 
Breeze 4; Senior Play 4. 



TOM SHIMROCK 

Basketball Manager 2; Track 2, 
3, 4; Hi-V 3, 4. 



RUTH SLIFE 

Radio Club 2; G.A.C. 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Recreation Club 2; Friendship 
Club 4; Shore Breeze Staff 2, 3, 
4; Girls' Leaders Club 2, 3, 4; 
President 4; Sec. 3. 



JOHN SMITH 

' Wrestling 3: Hockey 4; Hi-Y 3. 
4. 



DOROTHY SMITH 

Friendship Club 2, 3, 4; G.A.C. 
3. 4: Shore Breeze Staff 4. 




CLARA SCHLORACH 

Friendship Club 2, 3, 4; G.A.C. 
4; Annual Staff 4: Ad Commit- 
tee 3, 4; Banquet Committee 4. 



MARY SHIMKO 

Annual Staff 4; Pram. Club 4; 
Treas. 4; Whirlo 4; Shore 
Breeze 1; Annual Staff 4; Jr. 
Chamber of Commerce 2: Auto 
Drivers' Club 3; Bus. Club 3. 



GEORGE SKROBOT 

Basketball 3; Wrestling 2; Base- 
ball 3, 4; Class Officer 2. 



PHIL SOLESKI 

Glee Club 1, 2. 



JAMES SAIITH 

Hockey 3, 4; Hi-Y 3, 4. 



ROBERT SNODGRASS 

Hockey 4; Student Council 3. 
Class Officer 2. 



Page Thirty-three 



R \Y\I()\1) STOCKER 

Band 3. 4; Orchestra 1. 2, 3, -4; 
Concert Master -'. 3. 4; Movie 
Booth -\ 3, I; Slide Operator -'. 
3, 4: Drama Club 4 : Camera 
(.'lull 3; Stage Work 3, 4; Stu- 
dent Council 4. 




BETTY STROUP 

Friendship Club 3, 4. 



SHIRLEY SUGARMAN 

Friendship Club 2, 3; G.A.C. 2; 
Glee Club -'. 




fEAN TENCH 

G.A.C. -1; Girls' Readers Club 
4; Glee Club 1, 2, 3; Robed 
Choir 3, 4; .Shore Breeze Staff 
4; Annual Staff 4; Student 
Council I; Drama Club, Presi- 
dent 4. 



MILDRED VICKERMAN 

Hiking Club 2; Chorus 1, 2, 3, 
4; Dancing Culb 1, 2; Recrea- 
tion Club 3; Friendship Club 4; 
G.A.C. 3, 4; Glee Club 1; Robed 
Choir 3, 4; Senior Play 4. 



JOHN WARD 






WILLIAM WADE 

Football 3, 4; Wrestling 3, 4; 
Track 4; Hi-Y 3, 4. 



VIRGINIA WHITCOMB 

Friendship Club 3, 4; President 
4; G.A.C. 3. 4; Shore Breeze 
Staff 3, 4; Prom Committee 3; 
Ad Committee 1, 2, 3, 4; Senior 
Play 4. 



GEORGE WHITTLES 

Movie Booth 1, 2, 3, 4; Hi-Y 3; 
Senior Play 4. 



KEITH WILSON 

Football 1, 4; Baseball 3; Hi-Y 

4. 







ALICE WILSON 

Friendship Club 2, 3, 4; Glee 
Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Robed Choir 
3, 4. 



EVELYN RAPP 

Friendship Club 2, 3, 4; G.A.C. 

1, 2, 3, 4. 



ALBENA NOSEE 

G.A.C. 1, 2; Girls' Leaders Club 
4; Dancing Club 3; Whirlo Cluh 



Those Not Having Pictures 



LEROY DOUGLASS 

Hi-Y 4. 



JOSEPH MUHYIC 

Drama Club 4. 



KENNETH HARPER 

Orchestra 3, 4; Band 2, 3, 4. 



LARRY GNIDOYEC 

ELEANOR MIESE 



ROBERT SERRE 

Entered last part of Senior Year 
from Assumption High, Wind- 
sor, Ontario, Canada. 



GERTRUDE JEFFS 

Drama Club 4; Cheerleader 4; 
Athletics 4; School Play 4; Cap 
and Gown Committee 4; Sr. As- 
sembly Committee 4. Entered 
from Seattle, Washington, in 
Senior Year. 



RAE SCHLUND 

Friendship Club 2; G.A.C. 2; 
Glee Club 1; Shore Breeze Staff 
3; Vocation Club, Vice-President. 



Vane Thirty-five 



Those We Leave Behind 



Here are our underclassmen, but they will be Seniors some day 
too ! Until then, however, they are busy working hard, having fun 
and looking forward to the day when some Freshman will say — 
"Yes, they are Seniors." Then it will be their turn to take over the 
leadership of the school and help the new underclassmen on their 
way to Seniorship. We who are graduating take with us fine memo- 
ries of friends who will be "filling our shoes." 



MR. H INCH'S HOMEROOM 

First Row, Left to Right— M. Bezdek, I). Swcch, D. Daniel, W. Giesse, A. Baraga B Giam- 
poh, A. Bockcl, T. Calabrese, F. Calabrese, E. Brezic. 

Second Row—H. Mazick, V. Zust, J. Dale, B. Grove, R. Dickson, H. Riebe, E. Orivitz, E. 
Savchak. 

Third Row— Mr. Hinch, W. Witt. E. Bronaka, W. Channell, W. Zwerlein, W. Grossman 
A. Loncar, R. Rhodes, A. LoRe, J. Carrie. 





MR. SCHWEGLER'S HOMEROOM (Top) 



First Row, Left to Right— I. Fitzpatrick, I. Granm, M. Coffee, B. Buell, N. Fiddes, C. Armo- 
cida, J. Blew, J. Allender. 

Second Ron-— P. Uailey, E. Dreer, M. Cox, M. Golinar, I. Borlick, B. Bohatka, C. Baressi, 
H. Gole, M. Schwegler. 

Third Row—D. Ewell, M. Elliott, A. Bracklaw, D. Grove, R. Berry, R. Bogotay A Canni- 
telli, W. Uitrich, F. Gole. " 



MR. ANGENE'S HOMEROOM 

First Rozv—Mr. Angene, J. Kelly, J. Morris, H. Hug, E. Luikart, M. Horn, W. McUouo-all, 
V. Long, E. Gibson. 

Second Ron — K. Miller. F. Meunier, S. Metz, M. McKeon, D. Huher, J. Kirchner, C. Mezza- 
cappa, E. Holly, V. Knezevich. 

Third Ron — W. Grover, D. Novinc, R. Lloyd, M. Ncmic, W. Jackshaw, B. Janes, E. Mr- 
Kimmy, W. Kier. 



MISS CAMPBELL'S HOMEROOM 

First Row—M. Wenning, M. \'andervoort, R. Wallin, Miss Campbell, A. Papouchek, D. 
Zdara, C. Wentling. 

Second Roic—F. Perme, M. Zgonc, D. Wurster, L. Siers, M. Witt, B. Shafer, I. Telich. 

Third Ron—K. Welter, J. Wolfford, D. Somrak, R. Wismer, E. Walter, E. Saisell, G. Wid- 
ing. 



MISS DARST'S HOMEROOM 

First Row, Left to Right — R. Conrad, J. Davies, E. Fier, J. Coupe, B. Follis, R. Felker, 
A. Blasko, H. Kovacich. 

Second Row — R. Clare, \Y. Hartman, H. Lustig, J. Christopher, B. Homovich, D. Burns, 
E. Fox. 

Third Row—W. Hill, W. Larick, W. Beutler, J. [acobacci, W. Lehet, P. Brennan, Miss Darst. 



MR. SPAXGLER'S HOMEROOM 

First Rozv—E. Skoff, M. Queen, E. Matheke, C. Rand, M. Waltermire, E. Popvich, L. Uran- 
kar, M. Whitcomb, H. Von HofT, D. Schroeder, P. Syracuse, R. Yojsack. 

Second Row — C. Simpson, M. Rosenberg, R. Wright, K. Patrick, L. Wachtell, J. Town, 
J. Weir, M. Yuska, E. Miese, N. Matteo, S. Parisi, C. Malz, W. Palko. 

Third Ro~w — J. Wilson, E. Starina, J. Pardy, G. Mason, R. Randall, J. Maldovan, F. Mac- 
Namara, J. Roberts, R. Wellington, R. Shramm, E. Shaughnessy, M^r. Spangler. 




MISS AINGWORTH'S HOMEROOM (Top) 

First Row, Left to Right- G. Horen, M. Driver, M. Dempsey, R. Gill, H. Hanks, R. FM- 
munds, J. Ashley, J. Hadyk, J. Doughty, M. Andrews. 

Second Rozu—M. Brigleb, G. Berner, B. Cox, N. Blackwell, M. Gates, G. Blood, II. Harper, 
P. Dickson, E. Lugoshan, I,. Baker, Miss Aingworth, 

Third Row — F. Arko, C. Hranilovieh, R. Hunt, G. Hannaford, G. Donkin, N. Gorg, E. Dek- 
ker, L. Blase, V. Fuderer, B. Castelli. 



MISS DELAMATEK'S HOMEROOM 

First Ron — Miss Delamater, T. Lore, G. Massitt, D. Moeller, B. Kay, H. Loranger, E. Lamb, 
J. Millin, B. Martin. 

Second Row — I. Jasbeck, P. Newport, D. King, M. Mazick, E. Kordic, T. McWilliams, J. 
Kirchner, R. Long, R. Moore, J. Nelson. 

Third Row—M. Mulligan, N. MacDougall, J. Miller, M. Inda, R. Lotz, F. Knauss, W. Mur- 
ray, D. Metts, L. Janezic, J. Nebe. 



MR. WHITESIDE'S HOMEROOM (Bottom) 

First Rozv—T. Weatherhead, D. Stranahan, M. Zgonc, F. Yerman, R. Patton, S. Wallette, 
L. Praznovsky, R. Steffenhagen, E. Oliver, W. Robinson. 

Second Ron.' — M. Stopar, H. Yuska, J. Roberts, L. Ziegler, J. Staples, L. Zimmerman, G. 
Schmidt, S. Parratt, R. Roosma. 

Third Row— P. Rosa, J. Shimrock, P. Twohig, R. O'Dell, N. Scott, J. Sokach, L. Straka, 
J. Waterwash, Mr. Whiteside. 











MISS PHYPER'S HOMEROOM 

First Row, Left to Right— M. Gole, B. Campbell, R. Finnerty, L. Craft, C. Barresi, H. King, 
B. Bozic, A. Iacobacci, Miss Phypers. 

Second Row — C. Coupe, H. Henry, H. Coburn, M. Boles, E. Baughman, T. Amato, Y. Alex- 
ander. 

Third Row — J. Bergoch, A. Bolon, J. Hodgson. 



MR. WINTER'S HOMEROOM 



First Row, Left to Right — B. Miller, A. Johnson, D. Ljoce, J. Passerello, E. B&rkhauer, 
M. LaBar, V. Soules, F. Krauss, D. Sullivan. 

Second Roic—L. Phillips, J. Pretnar, R. Popek, M. Parziale, R. Krielach, H. Weybrecht, W. 
Zelman, R. Smith, T. Lamacchia. 

Third Row — B. Lipovic, J. McKinda, G. Shakaitis, J. Montana, G. Schmitt, B. Steverding, 
\\ r . Tiber, R. Kitcham, E. Cicemas. 




MISS ROSENBERGER'S HOMEROOM 

First Row, Left to Right—]. Arko, G. Drautz, C. Bill, B. Brodbent, B. Clausen, G. Bohatka, 
I). Carlone, D. Cobb, J. Cox, J. Casson. 

Second Row — E. Adams, T. Drazanic, J. Coulter, P. Cowin, E. Barina, A. Celizic, M. Berus, 
L. Curto, M. Cannon, A. Doberdruk, J. Adams, J. Barile, D. Di Santo, W. Clover, 
T. Credico. 



MISS PIERSON'S HOMEROOM 



First Row, Left to Right — E. Langa, P. Gibbons, M. Garapic, B. Kuchenbacker, P. Herman, 
G. Lardner, I. Ledinsky, D. Garapic, J. Hay. 

Second Row — R. George, P. Hardy, D. Lesh, E. Heyne, H. Huston, J. Iacobacci, D. Gross- 
man, E. Karlovic, L. Lardner. 

Third ffozc — T. Lasky, \Y. Gabrenya, T. Gole, J. Hayden, E. Holcamp, W'm. Ettenger, H. 
Falkenstein, R. Jacoby, W. Gubl, W. Krivoy, P. Lang. 






MISS TEMPERTON'S HOMEROOM 

First Rozv, Left to Right— W. Russell, M. McCarthy, F. Nevar, W. Maroncy, R. McKenna, 

J. McCandless, C. M minings, A. Roberts. 
Second Row — C. Reading, R. Matheke, J. Munier, B. Reiche, R. Parisi, N. McKimmy, V. Mi- 

jacek, R. Perovich, F. Pierce, E. Roloff. 
Third Row — A. Repasky, G. Novince, E. Pihernik, K. Rood, H. Nelson, H. Noch, J. Murray, 

P. Pfeiffer. 



MRS. WILSON'S HOMEROOM 

First Row, Left to Right — B. Schlaeger, P. Zerby, E. Uppole, J. Warwick, L. Zdara, A. 

Sugarman, P. Zeroff, M. Sullivan, B. Tenny, J. Von Hof, B. Wilson. 
Second Rozv—M. Walter, F. Smaltz, L. Tomsic, J. Skok, M. Wasserman, J. Watt, P. Tucker, 

J. Vickerman, F. Zupancic, U. Wickson, B. Wesley. 
Third Row — B. Schafer, T. Sadler, J. Watson, L. Zaitz, M. Trivisonno, R. Schlund, D. 

Tinker, W. Dorrington, R. Wightman, F. Stepic. 



£L Q 




ft . r ' J& 




MR. POHTO'S HOMEROOM 

First Row, Left to Right— Mr. Pohto, C. Frabatto, R. Coffey, W. Durkee, F. Bergoch, T. 

Bullard, P. Darby, J. Hawks, D. Dietrich. 
Second Row — S. Barresi, P. Blasko, M. Dvorak, N. Donahue, R. Calabrese, A. Hess, L. Da- 

\'irro, G. Dinwoodie. 
Third Row — G. Burns, D. Burns, J. Hueser, F. Hess, H. Fuderer, R. Haak, J. Dave, A. 

Fischer. 



MR. FINCH'S HOMEROOM 

First Row, Left to Right— P. Iacohacci, M. Perry, M. Masite, P. Malin, N. Lavo, D. Jen- 
nings, A. Lehet, M. McKee, E. Little, F. Roher. 

Second Row — W. Jevnikar, V. Janezic, W. Richardson, E. Mais, H. Roth, L. Mezzacappa, 
I. Horn, E. Korasin, G. Merrett, G. Hodge, L. Lardner, L. Runion. 

Third Row — E. Meyer, K. Raupach, T. Mizner, R. Tones, J. Knific, R. Munnings, E. Moody, 
M. Sill, B. Merritt, A. Royer. 



MISS CRONE'S HOMEROOM 

First Row, Left to Right—). Schafer, O. Straka, H. Lloyd, W. Winters, E. Wurster, J. 

Town, S. Swech, B. Wassum, B. Waltermire. 
Second Ro-w—1. Tartino, P. Yan, P. Wise, W. Wier, H. Thompson, J. Wallace, M. Watkins, 

J. Wilde, A. Heata. 




Pastimes 

and 

Pleasures 



Makers of Friendships True and 




FRIENDSHIP CLUB 
Friends galore in this happy group of friendly faces ! They set forth on a 
treasure hunt to discover the hidden gems of a valuable hidden school year. 
Recognition services launched the club on its pursuit of friends . . . spend- 
ing a whole week-end at Mary Eells Camp, an adventure never to be forgotten 
... an uproarious time at the Hallowe'en Party as movies were taken here 



HI-Y 
The Hi-Y members started out the school year with their annual tourna- 
ments ; these tournaments were not only among themselves but also with other 
Hi-Y's. As usual they were a great success as is anything these boys do. Musty 
smells ... old clothes . . . scratchy hay . . . hamburgers and the 
boys found themselves on a "Hay Ride" with Friendship girls with them. Did 
they have fun? Around Hallowe'en time the boys again got together and held 




Parjc Forty-six 



Holders of Memories Dear 




FRIENDSHIP CLUB (Continued) 
and there . . . quiz bees on Wednesday afternoons . . . prizes to brain- 
stem. Christmas came around and the Friendship club and Hi-Y club got 
together and emerged with a semi-formal dance. Miss Campbell has guided 
the girls throughout their club activities in keeping their ideals and goals, objects 
to be acquired. 



HI-Y (Continued) 
a "weiner roast" only somebody made off with some of the pies. The boys did 
their part when they combined with Friendship club for the semi-formal dance, 
anyway the girls thought so. Mr. Schwegler is the leader of this club and you 
have only to ask the boys if you desire to hear him heaped with praise. These 
boys are going far in the world making good young men. 




t'atje Forty-seven 



We Couldn't Do Without Them 




STUDENT COUNCIL 
In each homeroom in the school the Student Council is represented by a 
member and this member brings the room's suggestions for the betterment of 
the school to the Student Council meetings. Here the suggestions are discussed 
and voted upon and if the suggestion is voted worthy, the Councilors proceed to 
enforce it. This year as many years before, the Student Council has played an 
important part in school activities. They conducted the "Vocational Guidance 
Week" and have run a series of after school dances. The Council is under the 
supervision of Miss Aingworth. 



AD. COMMITTEE 
Have you bought your "Booster's Tag" to the football game? Have you 
bought your ticket to the Senior Play? With a barrage of "Have you's" we hnd 
the everbusy Ad. Committee members greeting you in the halls. They see to it 
that you hear and see about everything ahead of time. Shore needs boosters 
and these students make good leaders. Mr. Spangler is the guiding Booster in 
this Committee. 





* 




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w 



f 



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ma i 



Page Forty-eight 



Familiar Strains 




CHORUS 
Who has number seven . . . that's my music folio . . . Mr. Raisli, 
somebody has taken some music out of here . . . singing . . . music 
. . . two synonymous words but oh ! what a combination they spell when they 
stand for our first period Chorus. But not only do they signify a group of fifty 
voices, the)' also represent the interesting musical programs in assemblies, when 
we have heard the familiar strains of southern melodies. Friday ordinary rehear- 
sals stop and fearless members have chances to show off in front of their fellow 
classmates. 



GLEE CLUB 
Two traditions . . . one depending upon the other . . . Shore High's 
Christmas music and Shore High's Girls' Glee Club. Well do we appreciate 
their value . . . the haunting refrain of "Pale Moon" . . . floating 
through the air . . . rehearsals for "Gala Nite" and many more delightful 
programs. 




Paye Forty-nine 



Voices On High 



r 


© ft <-» ^ -, ° 


.iiii* * 



ROBED CHOIR 

Early morning rehearsals . . . black robes . . . starched 
white collars ... 30 voices . . . the P.-T. A. musical pro- 
gram . . . Gala Nite . . . bidding farewell to the seniors with 
the familiar strains of "The Rosary" . . . and last but not least, 
the annual concert with the band. Then to make the world all right 
the choir meets with other choral groups at Bedford to end the 
joyous season. Add all of these together and the sum equals that 
outstanding organization — the Robed Choir. 



fagc Fifty 



As The Baton Is Raised . . . 




ORCHESTRA 

Ever faithful . . . ever needed . . . this could be the definition of 
our school orchestra. At more serious programs given we find the orchestra 
playing favorite classical pieces whether the stirring "Triumphal March of the 
Priests" from Aida, or the light and airy "Tales of Vienna Woods." The 
orchestra's greatest importance comes at Commencements. 



RAND 



Sleet 



ind 



hail 



nothing to the band, always there 



. . a football game ... it means 
. spurring on the fight . . . boost- 
ing the team and proud as Dean Tinker "struts his stuff" in the sparkling new 
uniform. As a climax of their successful season, the annual band concert is 
held in April. ... So let's give three cheers for "Old Faithful," our band! 




Page Fifty-one 



The Girl Athlete 

GIRLS' SPORTS 

A flash (it a blade ... a bouncy white ball . . . the quiver of an 
arrow . . . the girls of Shore High competing with each other in Sports. 
Laughter . . . keep competition ... a loser in the game but a winner in 
spirit . . . all this speaks for the modern girl athlete. Straight and graceful 
bodies are built, minds are trained to be quick and alert while still having fun 
in sports such as Archery, Fencing, Ping Pong, Basketball, Volleyball, and 
many more. 




The Boy Athlete 




BOYS' SPORTS 

The same is true of Boys' Sports as is of Girls' Sports, except that more 
strength and force is shown by the boys as ... a dash around the field . . 
. . the show of intricate holds of the wrestler ... or the deft Hick of the 
wrist of the fencer. From Ping Pong to Boxing one finds a champion. Shore 
High is proud of its good Sportsmen! 



Cage Fifty-thr 



We Who Keep the Log Rolling 



Editor-in-Chief — Bette Fier 

Assistant Editor — May Carlgren 

Organizations Editor — Mary Shimko 

Sports Editor — Cornelia Kuchenbacher 
Art Editor — Marilyn Case 

Special Writers—Betty Hunt, Betty McCoy 

Typists — Adeline Geiger, Meryl Goodhead 

Photographers — Bob Huston. Bud Borger, Anthony LoRe, Fred McNamara 
Business Manager — George Greve 

Advertising Manager — Jim Moulton 

Subscriptions — Betty Gommel, Clara Schlobach. 
Betty Ray, Peggy Camplejohn, Betty Anderson 

Faculty Advisers — Mr. Angene, Mr. Finch, Mr. Card 

Faculty Photographers — Mr. Phillips. Mr. Hindi 




First Row — Mr. Card, Mr. Finch, M. Goodhead, A. Geiger, B. Fier, M. Carlgren, C. Knchen- 
bacher, M. Case, Mr. Phillips. 

Second /?ozc — B, Hunt, B. McCoy, C. Schlobach, 15. Heiss, B. Anderson, P. Camplejohn, 
B. Ray, Mr. Angene. 

Third Roi^ — J. Tench, E. Marshall, R. Huston, J. Moulton, G. Greve, J. Lipovec, F. Mc- 
Namara, Mr. Hinch. 



Page Fifty-jour 



Printed This Year! 



Vol. XVII 



Gebhart 
Junior { 

The 
of Marc 
Gebhart, 
History < 

Mr. j 
of raankli 
the e&m 
there tq 

Mr. 
bleuis o 
This v.a 
ways--o 
and not 

Mr 
illust, 
talked 
screen 
and it 
semblyj 



SHORE BREEZE 




Trip to Washington 
Is Still Uncertain 



The grant 
ceive a silver medal; the 
ner ups, a bronze medal. m 

To enter just Rive your name to 



.1 



SHORE BREEZE STAFF 



Editor 

Assistant Editor. 



Reporters : Betty Daniels, Bill Moore, 
Yerna Ohl, Anne Gregorin, Edna 
Rillie, Betty Heiss, Otis McKeon, 
Betty Anderson, Helen Von Hoff, 
Jean Kodger, Dick Dickson, Lois 
Semple, Joe Lipovec, Cornelia 
Kuchenbacker, Milan Plutt, Charles 
Armocida. 

Photographer: Fred McNamara. 

Circulation Manager 



Subscriptions received and deliveries 
representatives. 



Margot Graney 

Betty McCoy 

Typists : Billie Helphrey, Blanch 
Crocket, Anne Gregorin, Jean 
Tench, Virginia Whitcomb, Doro- 
thy Row, Dorothy Smith. 

Typesetters : George Fuller, Bill Fin- 
nerty. 

Makeup Editors : Adeline Geiger, 
Meryl Goodhead. 

Business Manager : James Dailey. 

Betty Anderson 

made bv Student Council Homeroom 



Faculty Advisers : Mr. Vaughn, Mr. Card, Miss Phypers. 



Puyc Fifty-five 



Clubs and Clubs 



GIRLS' LEADERS CLUB 

Our most recent club to join the frivolous group. The girls are leaders in 
even- way . . . new suits of white material are worn by members only. 
. . . These girls help conduct Gym classes and competitive tournaments. At 
Christmas they held a party which was successful in every way. All these happy 
hours are given to the credit of Miss Gill's untiring cooperation with these 
youthful athletes. 

BOYS' LEADERS CLUB 

These boy leaders are the equivalent of the girl leaders and they also help 
conduct Gym classes. The older boys wear shirts which tell that tiiey are in the 
club; the younger boys wear a shield which says, "Shore Leader." These boys 
played an important part in this year's Gym exhibition. 

G. A. C. 

The Girls' Athletic Club sponsors all tournaments after school and all mem- 
bers receive points according to the tournaments they are in, and after reaching 
the number of points, they are entitled to a letter. This letter is white set on 
green and every member receiving one is proud of it. It usually rewards the 
work of four years of high school, Freshman year through Senior year. 

DRAMATIC CLUR 
One more week 'til the production is to go on . . . worry . . . anxiety . . . then 
. . . relief ! Yes, you guessed it . . . we're talking about the Dramatic 
Club and "The Queen's Husband" . . . and also, not to be slighted. . . . 
"The Man In the Bowler Hat," Gala Nite's "A Happy Journey." But it isn't all 
play rehearsals and hard work. . . . Remember the fun at the dance on St. 
Patrick's day? . . . Under the able direction of Mr. Card . . . these have 
been the contributions given to us by the 1938-39 Dramatic Club ... so more 
power to them in continuing their share of contributions. 

TRAVEL CLUB 

Buenos Aires . . . the dashing sheiks of French Morocco . . . Cal- 
cutta, the land of rumbling herds . . . the gentle, rolling waters of the 
Waikiki beach and back to room No. 221 in less than an hour. Thus journey 
the members of our "Travel Club" with Miss Delamater, the stewardess. Be- 
tween brief respites the members bring their weaving and embroidery and try 
their hand at that. 

AVIATION CLUB 

"Men with Wings" . . . Oh, yeah? Horns, maybe, but not wings. Seri- 
ously, though, these air-minded boys study and speculate the future of aviation 
and all its possibilities as an even-more-modern-means of transportation, and 
aviation as a future career. Thus does Mr. Spangler guide these pliable minds 
in his Aviation Club. 

BUSINESS CLUB 

What dress shall I wear? Do these blazer sox match my plaid tie? Which 
linger do you strike the "A" with on the typewriter? Are abbreviations ever 
correct? (Not when I use them.) These and many more such questions are 
answered during Miss Darst's and Mr. Finch's Business Club meetings. 

Many other clubs meet on the Wednesday after noon but these are but a 
few representatives of the variety and the usefulness of the various clubs. 

Paye Fifty-six 




Paijc Fifty-seven 




The Fighting Admirals 

More than ever, this year Shore students are proud of the fighting Admirals, 
who won their first undisputed Eastern Conference Football Championship title. 
Close to sixty enthusiastic boys turned out at the call of Fall Football practice 
and from these boys, Coach Schwegler picked his winning team. 



Pai/c Fifty-ciyhl 






Sailing On To Victory 



(Continued from last page) 

The Admirals traveled to Canton Lehman for their first game, 
where they were honorary guests at Lehman's dedication of their 
new stadium and night lighting system. That night, the Shore boys 
failed to bring home a victory — however, Curto made up for the 
loss by bringing back a nice black eye. 

Shore journeyed to Brush to launch its first conference game 
attack and was met with warm weather and clean play. Brush was 
kept on the defense throughout the game. In spite of our aggres- 
sive team, the pigskin was carried over the line only once by our 
boys. 

Coming home for their next game, our confident team swamped 
Bedford under a great aerial attack. Maldovan received a serious 
leg injury and was missed from the team for the remainder of the 
season. 

Next, the Admirals romped over Garfield, away, and sank all 
of the hopes of Garfield's winning the championship. Our staunchy 
backfielder, Joe Dempsey, appeared for the first time this season 
in play, after his summer injury. 

With little snow and bitterly cold weather, Shore met its one 
undefeated opponent of last year — Mayfield. This game evened up 
last year's defeat of the Admirals and also, gave our second team a 
chance to play ( including Bob Berry after a call from the band for 

him). 

(Continued on next page) 



Page Fifty-nine 



(Continued from last page) 

The Shore eleven next encountered Maple Heights, away. Two 
excellent runs were made of about forty and fifty yards by joe 
Dempsey and Paul George, respectively, of which each resulted in 
touchdowns. Shore came out of this genuine "dust bowl" game 
victorious. 

To end the gridiron season, the Admirals trounced their tradi- 
tional rival under a deluge of thirty-nine points, allowing one — 
and the only one of the season — touchdown to Euclid Central. 



First Row. Left to Right— A. Papouschek, R. Bogotay, G. Greve, A. Bocke, J. Maldovan, W. Palko. 
Second Rozc, Bottom — J. Grossman, B. Clarke, R. Fanta, K. Wilson, P. George. 




(Continued from last page) 
The following is the 1939 Football season schedule 



*Canton Lehman 26 Shore... 

Brush Shore- 
Bedford Shore... 










6 

6 

25 


Garfield Shore... 


13 


Mavfield Shore... 

Maple Heights Shore... 

Kuclid Central 6 Shore... 










33 

40 

39 






Conference Total 6 

* Non-Conference game. 


156 


First Row—O. McKeon. M. Plutt, L. Palko, 


E. 


He 


glaw 




Second Row — W. Moore, W. Wade, J. Dempsey, A. 

y— — ^ — M— — — «■— ■■■■ a— — — 


Bi 


"icklov 


!, F. 


Montana 




The Wearers of the Blue and Gold 



Riebe, Harvey Forward 

Dempsey, Joseph Forward 

Clarke, Bruce Center 

Montana. Frank Guard 

McKeon, ( His Guard 

Lfipovec, Joseph Forward 

Blasko, August Forward 

Rover, Henry Center 

Curto, Joseph Guard 



Rockel, Allan Guard 

Maldovan, John Forward 

Papouschek, Anton Forward 

Heglaw, Edward Center 

Dietrich, William Center 

Schwartz, George Center 

Shaugnessy, Emmett Guard 

Moffet, Bryan Manager 



Ford L. Case — Coach 
Henry Schmidt — Asst. Coach 

Glenville . . . For the second straight year, the tar-blooders fell before 
Shore's smooth working Admirals. Mayheld . . . The green and white of 
Mayfield fell before the fast breaking tactics of the Shore team to the tune of 
59 to 20. Harvey Riebe dropped in twenty points to tie the Shore record set by 
his hrother, Mel, in 1931. Maple Heights . . . The Admirals beat a power- 
ful Heights quintet in stride. Central . . . Shore won the first leg on the 
beautiful new American Legion trophy by smothering the Lions 69 to 26. Capt. 
Frank Montana whisked the net for twenty markers to tie the Shore record heid 
jointly by Mel and Harvey Riebe. Mentor . . . The smooth working combi- 
nation of Riebe-Dempsey-Clarke-McKeon-Montana played its last game together 
by trouncing Mentor 59-16 the next night after the Central game. Brush . . 
. . The Admirals trailing 15-3 at the half, staged one of the most brilliant 
rallies seen on any court in years walloping the Brown and Gold 29-8 the second 
half, to come in easy victors with a score of 32-23. 




First Rn:^, Left to Rii/ht—V. Montana, A. Bockel, O. McKeon, J. Dempsey, H. Riebe, J. 

Curto, B. Clarke. 
Second Row — I. Lipovec, A. Papouschek, E. Shaunessv, E. Heglaw, W. Dietrich, A. Blasko, 

B. Moffet, Mr. Case. 
Third Row — J. Christopher, J. Town, T. W'eatherhead, J. Robinson, G. Schwartz, \Y. Zwier- 

lien, R. Berry, R. Palko, D. Melts. 



Page Sixty-two 



It's a "Case" of "Netting" Victories 




BASKETBALL (Continued) 

Bedford . . . This team was downed in a close contest, 29-27, at Bed- 
ford. The game was marked by long range shooting by the home team and the 
game was not decided until Joe Curto, Admiral guard, looped in a double decker 
from far out to decide the victor. Garfield . . . Garfield and Shore came up 
to the last league game without defeats to pack in the largest crowd to see a bas- 
ketball game in the history of Shore Basketball. Garfield's classy quintet was 
able to put on a finishing drive to win in the last four minutes of play to cop 
their first Eastern Conference crown. Fairport . . . The Blue and Gold 
Admirals surged back to whip a powerful Fairport five for their first defeat in 
16 games to the tune of 40-30. Ed Heglaw at center and Joe Curto at guard 
played good defensive roles to assist the dependable scoring combination of 
Riebe and Dempsey. 



N.E.O. SECTIONAL TOURNAMENT 

Shore held the Sectional Tournament for the second consecutive vear. only 
to have their own team draw the Fairport team, by a queer quirk of fate, and be 
eliminated by the team they had beaten by ten points a week before. Joe Demp- 
sey and Harvey Riebe acted co-captains the second semester and made prob- 
ably the best pair of running mates at forwards to wear the school colors in. 
recent vears. 



Page Sixty-three 



The Familiar Blue Light 





*0* 



S*^ 



WO*, 



•sfcO*' ' ***»<+, .1 ^| -*»"' 




Firjf Rovl>—W. Moore, W. Palko, J. Smith, R. Schroeder, J. Hannaford, R. Brandt, W. Mur- 
ray, D. Nickson. 

Second Row — Ossie Asmundsen, L. Palko, D. Ewell, P. Twohig, E. Heglaw, J. Smith, J. 
Henn. 



Shore is mighty proud of its 1938-1939 Hockey squad of which each puck 
ster proved of some value to the team. 

1938-1939 HOCKEY SQUAD 

Ossie Asmundsen — Coach 
Robert Phillips — Assistant Coach 



Ed Heglaw Left Wing 

1 )ick Schroeder - Center 

Bob Fisher Right Wing 

Jim Smith Left Defense 

Jack Smith Right Defense 

Bill Moore Right Defense 

John Ragborg Left Defense 

Lenny Palko Right Wing 

Bill Palko Right Wing 

Jack Grossman Right Wing 



DeForest Ewell Center 

Bob Brandt Left Wing 

Jack Schlaeger Left Wing 

Paul Twohig Left Defense 

Darrel Wickson Left Wing 

Jack Blattau Center 

Bill Murray Center 

Jack Hannaford Goalie 

John Henn Manager 



Pape Sixty-four 



The Admiral pucksters moved into their second hockey season with five 
lettermen and an enthusiastic group of new players. Skating off to a surprise 
victory over Cathedral Latin, and easily trouncing Holy Name, the icers next 
staged their hardest fought battle against Shaker, only to meet their first defeat. 
The pucksters carried the fighting spirit of Shore with them and masterfully 
slid through the season with only three defeats by Shaker, Cleveland Heights, 
and Shaw, and tied two matches with University and East High. 

Shore was eliminated in the first round of play-offs by East High, whom 
they had held to a scoreless tie in a previous game. This was the final blow to 
an almost perfect hockey season, but before the play-offs our pucksters held 
second place in both divisions, tying the leaders of the Metropolitan division. 



J. SMITH 



P. PALKO 



J. SMITH 




L. PALKO 



R. SCHROEDER 



J. HANNAFORD 



Pane Sixty-five 



Presenting the Boys 
Who "Set the Pace" at Shore 




First Roic — R. Grossman, A. Bracklow, J. Maldovan, L. Palko, P. George, M. Plutt, R. Mat- 
thews, R. Wellington. 

Second Row — Mr. Case, W. Larick, W. McDongall, T. Shimrock, R. Harper, W. Channell, 
J. Flammang, W. Zweirlien. 



Shore's hopes for a successful track season look fair, due to the fact that 
Shore tied with Brush and Bedford in the C. A. C. Indoor Meet. 

The following is Shore's 1939 Track Meet schedule : 



*Apri 
Mav 

*Mav 
May 
May 
Mav 
May 

*Mav 
Mav 
May 
May 



26 



—Garfield 7 

1 — Universitv 

3— Bedford " 

6 — Mentor Relavs at Mentor 

8— Brush '. 

10— Brush 

15— Bedford 

17 — Alumni 

20— District Meet 

23 — Eastern Conference Preliminaries 
24 — Eastern Conference Finals at Bedford 
May 26-27— State Meet 

*June 7 — Central Shore 

(Junior High American Legion Meet) 

*Home Meets. 



Shore Ill 

Shore 

Shore 

Shore 

Shore 

Shore 

Shore 



Patic Sixty six 






Pitching . . . Slugging . . .Fielding 



At Coach John Pohto's first call for candidates, seventy-five willing boys 
turned out for baseball. It was the biggest turn-out in the history of Shore's 
sports. 

The squad was later reduced to twenty-five, of whom three were letter- 
men, Harvey Riebe, Elmer Weinschreider, and Capt. Frank Montana. 

Joe Curto and Rob Jason turned out to be two of the best pitchers in the 
Metropolitan League. Their steady pitching did much in the way of contributing 
to Shore's fine season. 

The dependable slugging of Riebe, Weinschreider, and Montana were other 
highlights on offense. Some good fielding by Rezdek and Heglaw featured the 
outfield on defense . 

Shore won the championship of the Eastern Division of the Metropolitan 
League and were semi-finalists in the district play-offs, losing to Cleveland 
Heights. 

The following was the 1938 schedule of baseball : 



Brush 6 Shore 4 

Euclid Central .... 1 Shore... 8 

Collinwood 8 Shore 7 

Mayfield 4 Shore 13 

Benedictine 4 Shore.. 6 

John Adams 7 Shore 5 



Mayfield Shore 4 

Rrush 3 Shore 4 

East Tech 7 Shore 1 

Latin 4 Shore 5 

Benedictine 3 Shore. 5 




Page Sixty-seven 



Matmen of Shore 




Even though Shore's matmen got off to a late start this year, they did well 
for themselves. Under Coach Pohto and Captain Bill Wade the grapplers soon 
made up for lost time by taking second place in the Conference. This year's team 
was composed of seventeen muscular boys. 

Shore had three home matches and traveled to the opponents' mats four 
times, making a total of seven matches. The matmen won four of their matches 
and placed four boys in the City Wrestling Tournament. Bill Wade won fourth 
place in the heavyweight division ; Lenny Craft, fourth place in the 165-pound 
division ; Al Roosma, second place in the 145-pound division, and Al Bracklow 
took second place in the 155-pound division. 



Here is the 1938-39 Wrestling Schedule: 



Shaker 29 

Central 29 

University 12 

*Parma 9 

Garfield 31 

*Shaker 7 

*Central 12 

*Home Matches. 



Shore 15 

Shore 12 

Shore 15 

Shore 35 

Shore 10 

Shore 31 

Shore 23 



Pngc Sixty-eight 



Day by Day at Shore 



SEPTEMBER hath XXX remarkable days: 

30. The heavens will weep. But all the rain in the world won't keep Shore 
from fighting even though the stars prophesy victory for the Green 
and White. 

October hath XXXI days: 

1. Here at last we have a get-together for the Friendship Club at Mary 
Eells Camp. 

4. Our regular dashing football heroes playing the Post Graduate football 
players who came back to learn how to play football. 

5. Our first Shore Brcccc issue was printed. 

6. Generally clean and mild in ocean region. Faculty seamen and sea- 
women attending a nautical party will encounter pleasant weather. 

7. Shore puts on her war paint; "Beat Bedford!" in pep assembly pro- 
claims aloud her bloody war cry. 

10. Mr. Peake will address the Senior Class on Vocations. 

12. Some of the Seniors taking an afternoon oft to go and see "You Can't 
Take It with You." 

13. Miss Darst's Business Girls' Club went to visit the Addressograph- 
Multigraph Company. 

17. Volley ball teams got well under way in the new gym. 

20. Recognition services for the Friendship Club. 

21. Garfield tribe takes a whipping at the hands of Shore High. 

24. A mathematical genius displayed his abilities before the breathless stu- 
dent body in assembly. 

26. Playhouse stages a play called "Ditch Diggers" for the benefit of the 
Community Fund. 

27. Mayfield takes a trouncing from old Shore High. Friendship Club 
girls get together for a grand Halloween Party. 

28. No School ! Teachers in Suburbs go to Cleveland for the annual teach- 
ers' convention. 



Pogc Sixty-nine 




Pai/c Seventy 



Day by Day at Shore 



November hath XXX days: 

2. Drama Club gave a play in Assembly. 

3. W.P.A. swing band will play for the students presided over by the 
Student Council. 

4. Maple Heights takes a whipping from the Admirals. 

9. The Automobile Club gives an assembly on "Preventing Accidents." 

10. Football Rally at Shore's field for the Shore-Central game. 

11. Shore wins from Euclid Central but Central spoiled Shore's chances of 
a scoreless season in the Eastern Conference. 

14. General Assembly on "Let us have a purpose and a career." 

15-18. Conferences on vocations for all of the Senior High. 

16. The Federal Music Project Band gave a splendid concert in assembly. 

24. Shore gives thanks — no school for four days. 

Dkcembkr hath XXXI days: 

2. Tag dance honors our football players. 

3. Our Hockey Team starts oft* with a bang ! Today marks their second 
victory. 

7. One of the hockey boys interviewed their coach, Ozzie Asmundson. 

10. Our first defeat in hockey. Shaker is the victor. 

12. Girls' Leaders Club chose basketball teams and had pictures taken later. 

13. Chorus sings for P.T.A. Colored swing band plays during the ninth 
and tenth periods. 

14. A few Gala Night acts being given in Assembly. 

15. Austin Wiley plays for the Friendship and Hi-Y Clubs. 

16. Admirals boost game with Glenville. 

21. Colorful Christmas Pageant given in Assembly. Friendship-Hi- Y for- 
mal dance given. School closes for the appreciated two-weeks vacalion. 

28. Shore wins another hockey game. 



Vaue Seventy-one 



Day by Day at Shore 



January hath XXXI days: 

4. Basketball plays explained to all in assembly. 

6. Shore cagers win from Mayfield. 

7. Shore pucksters defeat West. 

10. January graduating class has its banquet. What a night! 

11. Shore has college night for Seniors and their parents. 

12. Friendship Club enjoys a Farewell Party given to departing Seniors. 

13. Withstanding the jinx of Friday 13, our cagers won their game with 
Maple Hts. 

16. Quite stormy out; teachers decide to parallel the weather with a similar 
blizzard of report cards. 

26. Shore wrestlers attack Parma. 

February hath XXVIII days: 

1. Drama Club presents "Queen's Husband." 
11. Hockey team wins from Collinwood. 

20. A special assembly for information on fire drills. 

March hath XXXI days: 

1. Half a day off due to the Teachers' Convention. 
10. Musical quartette entertains student body, also fencing exhibition. 
25. Shore given hockey crown to victor East. 
31. Students rejoice as Easter holidays emerge with lovely weather. 

April hath XXX days : 

1. April Fool's day is shouted at everyone else who forgot it. Shore track 
team participates in Arena meet. 

21. Orchids to the cast of the Senior Play "Charm School." It certainly 
was a hit ! 



Page Seventy-two 



BRAWN'S 


Kenmore 0585 


CONFECTIONERY 


COMPLIMENTS OF 


and DAIRY STORE 


NOTTINGHAM 


Ice Cream High Grade 


DEPARTMENT STORE 


Sodas and Candies 
Sundaes and Pastries 

o 


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FOR THE ENTIRE FAMILY" 




Leonard Mandel 18607 St. Clair Ave. 


22078 Lake Shore Blvd. Ken. 1035 


Proprietor Cleveland, Ohio 


MOHAWK HARDWARE 




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At the "SQUIRE SHOP" 


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RADIO TUBES . . GLASS 


Complete Seasonal Outfits 


BUILDERS' HARDWARE 


For Men and Young Men 


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HAROLD FURNITURE 


• • 


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An Uptown Store with Downtown 


"MOTHER, MAY WE HAVE MORE?" 


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Page Seventy-three 



Vestments for Choir and Pulpit 

TheC. E.WARD COMPANY 

NEW LONDON, OHIO 

Graduation Caps and Gowns 
Band Uniforms 

Gowns for School Choirs and Glee Clubs 



Write for Free Catalogs 

Prescriptions Drugs Cand ; es 

FIFTY-TWO 

STANDARD DRUG STORES 

The Standard for Pure Drugs 
since 1899 



Toiletr 



Sodas 



Cigars 



COMPLIMENTS 

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* * * 



IGantttjH 



3. MAXINE OHL 


4. MERYL GOODHEAD 


• 


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FROM A FRIEND 


of 


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ALMOST DAILY! 


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RADIO and REFRIGERATION 


BETTY'S BEAUTY SHOPPE 


For Graduation Gifts 
See Herb Fitzgerald 


All Branches of Beauty Culture 


• 


Kenmore 2548 606 E. 185th St. 


635 E. 185th Ke. 1313 


* * * 



Paye Seventy-four 



48 Years in Business 


Printing 




GREETING CARDS 




PHOTOGRAPHIC SUPPLIES 




PHOTO FINISHING 


THE UNION SAVINGS AND 


ENLARGING AND COLORING 


LOAN COMPANY 




232 Superior Avenue, N. E. 


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EUCLID NEWS-JOURNAL 




675 East 185th St. 


Real Estate Loans — 3% Interest on 


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Savings Deposits 




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Federal Savings and Loan Insurance ! 


COMPLIMENTS 


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KENMORE 4005 












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Suits . . Coats . . Dresses 

Hosiery . . . Accessories 

Sport Attire 

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We'll be there." 

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LLOYD ROAD 


A FRIEND 






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Page Seventy-five 



Herff- Jones Company 

DESIGNERS AND MANUFACTURERS 

of 

SCHOOL AND COLLEGE JEWELRY 

GRADUATION ANNOUNCEMENTS 

MEDALS, CUPS AND TROPHIES 

INDIANAPOLIS, IND. 

JEWELERS TO SHORE HIGH SCHOOL 



15. SHIRLEY SUGARMAN 15. DOROTHY ROW 16. BETTY DANIELS 

SMITH'S 

Barbecue and Restaurant, Inc. 

serves 

GOOD FOOD 

LUNCHES DINNERS 

22305 L S. Blvd. Ken. 2792 

JOHN VIDRICK JOHN POLSON 

19. VERNAOHL 20. MILDRED VICKERMAN 2 I . VIRGINIA NEMEC 



Page Seventy-six 



Eddies' Service Stations, Inc. 

22259 LAKE SHORE BLVD. 

Texaco Gasoline Texaco, Kendall and Valvoline Motor Oils 

Lubrication . . Mohawk Tires . . Exide and Willard Batteries 

Cars Called for and Delivered 
PHONE KENMORE4227 



5. HELEN SAVCHAK 6. BETTY JO PATTON 7. BETTE FIER 



Purpose 

TO FIND AND GIVE THE BEST" 

FRIENDSHIP IS THE GEM OF LIFE 



-••- 



THE FRIENDSHIP CLUB 



7. HAZEL HAWLEY 18. BLANCHE CROCKETT 

• 



Payc Seventy-seven 



COMPLIMENTS 



of the 



Student Council 



8. JEAN TENCH 9. FRANCES KARDOS 10. MAY and MARGARET DAVIS 



INTERESTING PORTRAITS 

PRICES QUOTED ON QUANTITIES OF 
3 OR MORE 



The Newman Studio 



PHOTOGRAPHERS 



1706 Euclid Avenue MA 2333 



Page Seventy-eight 



Addressograph . . . Multigraph 

SPEEDS UP THE "PAPER WORK" 
OF BUSINESS ON ALL FRONTS 



Addressograph and Multigraph supply an essential need in every 
business. Their value has been endorsed through constantly increasing 
use, over a long period of years, in every class of business enterprise. 

Addressograph . . . for speed and accuracy in the routine 
copying of names and data on various forms used in every 
business; for protection against error, delay and waste. 
Multigraph . . . for convenient and economical duplicating of 
a wide variety of business forms and communications necessary 
to carry on business and increase sales of its products or 

services. 

In any business or profession you choose, you will find that Address- 
ograph and Multigraph Methods provide advantages to ease the 
burden of daily routine — protect your interests as well as those of your 
employer — help you progress. 



A ddressograph-M ultigraph Corporation 

CLEVELAND, OHIO 



Ptuje Seventy-nine 



COMPLIMENTS OF THE 



Shore Hi-Y Club 



Boosters Column 



THE AMERICAN SHOE REPAIRING BEN MAUN 



BEACHLAND BEAUTY SHOP 



MOSS POINT HARDWARE 



BEACHLAND PHARMACY 



MR. AND MRS. J. SUGARMAN 



DR. AND MRS. M. J. CLUCKER 



TUCKER SHOES 



HARBAK'S PASTRY SHOPPE 



WRIGHT STORE, 696 E. 185th 



JOE GORG 



LOWES TOGGERY 



Page Eighty